Jim Larkin’s Struggle For The Revolution Of Labour

Jim Larkin was a certified trade unionist born to Irish parents in Liverpool in 1874. His parents were not well off and growing up in the slums; he had only attained a low level of education.

Mr. Larkin worked several jobs to subsidize his family’s little income, and through the hustle, he eventually became a supervisor at the Liverpool docks. The employee rights activist who believed social workers were mistreated became a part of the Dock Laborers State Union and in 1905 became an active service trade union organizer.

In 1907, NUDL trans positioned him to Dublin because they felt that his strike methods were a little pushy. In Dublin, Jim formed the ITGWU, a union whose main agenda was to bring together all skilled and non-skilled Irish industrial workers into one organization. Read more: James Larkin | Biography and James Larkin – Wikipedia

In 1913, along with his partner James Connolly, Jim Larkin formed the Irish labor party that led a series of successful strikes. The most symbolic strike was the Dublin Lockout that had over 100,000 workers demonstrating for close to 8 months and finally winning their rights to fair employment.

On the onset of the first world war, Jim Larkin pioneered massive anti-war demonstrations calling on all Irish men to avoid the conflict. He later traveled to the United States for a lecture tour and to collect donations meant to help resist the British.

In the states, Larkin became a part of IWW, an industrial workers forum and the socialist movement in America. During his time there, the 1916 Easter rising took place in Ireland claiming the life of his partner, James Connolly. Following Connolly’s demise, Jim formed the James Connolly Socialist club that was based in New York which later became the center of all left-wing activities.

In 1920, Jim Larkin was convicted for communism and criminal anarchy. Three years later he was pardoned and deported to Ireland. He then organized the Workers Union of Ireland and was recognized by communist International in 1924.

He officially became an affiliate of the Irish Labor party in 1945 and was still active in fighting for employee rights till he passed on in January 1947.